Access your downloads at our archive site. Visit Archive
Mark At Desk 1
Blog

Longsuffering Service to the Kingdom

The world we see around us is full of pretention. Sanctification is God’s making us into whom we ought to be by His mercy to us. Just as with that work in us, the redemption of all things around us is painfully slow. God is longsuffering with us as individuals; let us not let our impatience for the fullness of His Kingdom frustrate us.

Mark R. Rushdoony
  • Mark R. Rushdoony,
Share this

Someone asked a question recently on the Final Judgment. The word “judgment” connotes to us the imposition of a punishment. It can be that, of course, but we must also see judgment as restoration of a justice, order, and true peace that was upset by wrongdoing. If there is no form of judgment, then some degree of lawlessness will prevail. The Final Judgment represents the declaration of God’s peace and justice. To the redeemed, judgment should be seen as the coming rainbow in the sky, representing the finality of God’s order prevailing.

But there is another statement that many find troublesome. In Romans 14:11-12, Paul says.

For it is written, as I live, saith the Lord, every knee shall bow to me, and every tongues shall confess to God.
So then everyone one of us shall give account of himself to God.

Some have wondered if all men will really, in turn, confess their sins to God. That may be (I think there is no time at that juncture), but I imagine a slightly different fulfillment. Perhaps it only means that when we stand before God, we will have a total awareness of our human sinfulness and the righteousness of God. There will be no self-deception or pretentions, and yet a full awareness of the grace of God in which we will stand.

But the world we see around us is full of pretention. Sanctification is God’s making us into whom we ought to be by His mercy to us. Just as with that work in us, the redemption of all things around us is painfully slow. God is longsuffering with us as individuals; let us not let our impatience for the fullness of His Kingdom frustrate us. Our duty is to be like the servants of the parable who serve the Master in His absence.


Mark R. Rushdoony
  • Mark R. Rushdoony

Mark R. Rushdoony graduated from Los Angeles Baptist College (now The Master’s College) with a B.A. in history in 1975 and was ordained to the ministry in 1995.

He taught junior and senior high classes in history, Bible, civics and economics at a Christian school in Virginia for three years before joining the staff of Chalcedon in 1978. He was the Director of Chalcedon Christian School for 14 years while teaching full time. He also helped tutor all of his children through high school.

In 1998, he became the President of Chalcedon and Ross House Books, and, more recently another publishing arm, Storehouse Press. Chalcedon and its subsidiaries publish many titles plus CDs, mp3s, and an extensive online archive at www.chalcedon.edu. His biography of his father will be published later this year (2024).

He has written scores of articles for Chalcedon’s publications, both the Chalcedon Report and Faith for all of Life. He was a contributing author to The Great Christian Revolution (1991). He has spoken at numerous conferences and churches in the U.S. and abroad.

Mark Rushdoony has lived in Vallecito, California, since 1978.  His wife, Darlene, and he have been married since 1976. His youngest son still resides with him. He has three married children and nine grandchildren.

More by Mark R. Rushdoony