Magazine
A Christian Christmas
December 2001

Biblical Faith and American History (Part 2: The Present)

By R. J. Rushdoony

We cannot begin to understand the present condition of the United States apart from the decline of the Reformed Faith. The War of Independence was a triumph for Puritan postmillennialism, but it was also a major factor in its decline.

Those Long-Lived "Last Days"

By P. Andrew Sandlin

In recent times, we have heard a lot about “The Last Days.”

Books and Things No. 10

By P. Andrew Sandlin

Samuel P. Huntington’s The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996), already a bestseller, has gained additional attention after the attacks of September 11, 2001.

Student Worldview Conferences

By P. Andrew Sandlin
By Mark R. Rushdoony

Some Christians shun the Christmas tree as inappropriate or even ungodly because of its long association with pagan usage. This writer sees the Christmas tree as a Biblically sound tradition that represents a significant victory for Christendom over paganism.

By Joel Miller

Every denomination and Christian tradition in America has its scare-words. Baptists start squirming the second “infant baptism” enters the conversation.

By Samuel L. Blumenfeld

There is much disappointment these days among conservatives who have or haven’t expected the new Bush administration and conservatives in Congress to reverse the liberal drive toward socialism and global government.

By Linda Hoffman

From Mister Rogers to Rambo, the media displays a disgusting picture of what our culture believes a man to be. Even disguised as a purple dinosaur, our children are being filled with ideas of what a true man is.

By Ian Hodge

Imagine what it would be like to be able to write a letter each April to the IRS thanking them for the opportunity to participate in the tax program, but this year you were not going to contribute.

By Christine Schirrmacher

The term “Islam” means “submission,” “surrender,” or “dedication” to God. A Moslem is somebody who submits to God and obeys the obligatory Islamic laws and commands.

By Steve M. Schlissel

In 1894, the perspicacious prophet of the Confederacy, Robert Lewis Dabney, aimed his x-ray vision at a subject which troubled him deeply: the defection of large numbers of Protestants to Rome.