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Suicidal humanism
Magazine Article

Why Christian Reconstruction is the Answer to Suicidal Humanism

We are watching our culture fall apart, and people bemoan that we no longer live in the moral universe we once did, or the social universe we experienced just a generation or two ago. What was built by centuries of Christendom is now deteriorating, and that’s why my father put forward the single idea that the response to this suicidal humanism is Christian Reconstruction.

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John F. Kennedy once suggested that our problems today are technical, not moral. In other words, we’re on the right track. We’re on the ascendancy, and all that’s needed to solve our social ills are advances in medicine, computer sciences, and other technologies. Modern man thinks that he’s on the right road to controlling everything scientifically, and yet, morally, our situation only gets worse.

Saying our problems are technical avoids what they truly are: that man is a rebel against God, and he’s a sinner. He rebels against his creator and his creator’s law, and my father used the term humanism quite frequently to describe this. If you think of an authority structure, humanism is when you remove God and the supernatural realm entirely from your thinking, and it assumes that the highest form of being is man. This essentially leaves man in charge giving him a de facto authority and position that he does not have in a Biblical worldview.

Pushing God Out of the Picture

When you embrace the idea that human history can be explained entirely through evolution, you end up pushing God out of the picture, labeling Him as nothing more than a made-up character from ancient stories, i.e., a myth. People created these myths because they fulfilled a certain need for understanding and meaning.

Darwin’s theories have further entrenched this viewpoint, suggesting that the universe and everything in it, including us, have always existed in some physical form or another. Everything we observe and experience is considered to be a result of the natural and ongoing processes of a universe that has always been here, making God and religious beliefs appear as human inventions rather than the foundation of truth itself.

People who adhere to this perspective claim that time, space, and matter have always existed; these are eternal properties unique to our universe. This leads them to question the nature of religion and the existence of God, suggesting that these are mere human creations. In their eyes, religion is simply a fabricated system of beliefs.

With this mindset, they feel completely justified in believing that religion is not ultimately necessary and can be phased out over time. They distance themselves from any religious or supernatural explanations of the world, choosing not to incorporate them into their understanding of human existence and the issues we face.

As a result, modern man adopts a mechanical view of the universe, confident that he has grasped its true nature, especially since the advent of Darwinian theory. Man believes that all answers to our problems can be found within the universe itself, dismissing the need for any divine or supernatural intervention.

Restablishing the Foundation

We are watching our culture fall apart, and people bemoan that we no longer live in the moral universe we once did, or the social universe we experienced just a generation or two ago. What was built by centuries of Christendom is now deteriorating, and that’s why my father put forward the single idea that the response to this suicidal humanism is Christian Reconstruction.

That means doing what God says as we start with ourselves and our families, and then we work outward to our vocations and our various spheres of influence, but we have to start obeying God to reestablish the foundation upon something that’s real. What is real is that God says “thou shalt not,” or things will go badly for you, and we’re proving day by day, year by year, that when we disobey God, and we defy His law, things go badly.