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Salvation and Godly Rule

By R. J. Rushdoony
November 18, 2009

Man was called to dominion (Gen. 1:26-28), and to establish his reign over the world under God. By his fall, man introduced the reign of death into the world, and as long as he remains in the Fall, sin reigns in him unto death, both in time and eternity. Christ, however, by His grace and the gift of righteousness, enables man to reign in this world, and to reign through righteousness in time and eternity.

Salvation means reigning. As formerly rebellious slaves, we are now established in kingship, and described as "more than conquerors" (Rom. 8:37) in Christ, because we are also kings.

The full meaning of salvation cannot be understood apart from the fact of reigning. The multiple use of the word "reign" in Romans makes clear the centrality of reigning in the doctrine of redemption. To defer this fact to another world is a false separation into two alien realms - one (the material) surrendered to one god, and the other (spiritual) reserved for the other god. Neither is Biblical.

St. Paul is emphatic: we "reign in life." The Biblical doctrine of salvation requires it.

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Topics: Dominion

R. J. Rushdoony

Rev. R.J. Rushdoony (1916–2001), was a leading theologian, church/state expert, and author of numerous works on the application of Biblical law to society. He started the Chalcedon Foundation in 1965.  His Institutes of Biblical Law (1973) began the contemporary theonomy movement which posits the validity of Biblical law as God’s standard of obedience for all. He therefore saw God’s law as the basis of the modern Christian response to the cultural decline, one he attributed to the church’s false view of God’s law being opposed to His grace. This broad Christian response he described as “Christian Reconstruction.”  He is credited with igniting the modern Christian school and homeschooling movements in the mid to late 20th century. He also traveled extensively lecturing and serving as an expert witness in numerous court cases regarding religious liberty. Many ministry and educational efforts that continue today, took their philosophical and Biblical roots from his lectures and books.

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